STD Testing in North Carolina

North Carolina is among those U.S. states where cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including gonorrhea, herpes, chlamydia, and syphilis, are on the rise. Where some states criminalize the transmission of STDs, North Carolina, by law, doesn't. Instead, the state's law requires that anyone with HIV must comply with specific regulations to control the disease's spread. However, if an HIV infected person exposes another person to the virus, they could be charged with assault.

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STD testing near me in North Carolina

It is a fact that in North Carolina, fewer young people are indulging in early sex and teen pregnancy rates in the state are at historic lows. However, people in general and teens, in particular, are still contracting STDs in North Carolina. In fact, the state has been observing some of the highest gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis rates, according to the 2018-19 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

It is important to note that any sexually active person can get an STD, as per CDC, so regular screening becomes so important. Moreover, STDs can be prevented by adopting the necessary preventive measures and early diagnosis through testing to help treat the disease timely. Women can be infected with syphilis when they are pregnant, and if it is not detected during the first trimester, the disease could be detrimental to the health and wellbeing of their unborn child.

CDC's STD Prevention Division director Gail Bolan stated that each baby born with syphilis indicates the failure of the whole system. Screening is the only way to detect STDs at the right time and prevent further damage.

Avoiding STDs is the responsibility of every individual living in a high-risk region, such as North Carolina. However, even using condoms to avoid them isn't a 100% effective prevention strategy, and you may still get the infection. Hence, every couple should get tested for STDs even if they do not feel any symptoms.

Labcorp At Walgreens

No Appointment Required

511 W Williams St, Apex, North Carolina 27502

8.9 mile

Tel: 9197090628


Tests Offered

  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Hepatitis A Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Rapid HIV Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

See Tests & Prices

Today's best offer is: $10 off any order. Discount will be applied automatically.

Labcorp At Walgreens

No Appointment Required

3601 Davis Drive, Morrisville, North Carolina 27560

10.47 mile

Tel: 9194685042


Tests Offered

  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Hepatitis A Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Rapid HIV Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

See Tests & Prices

Today's best offer is: $10 off any order. Discount will be applied automatically.

Labcorp At Walgreens

No Appointment Required

301 N Main St, Holly Springs, North Carolina 27540

12.6 mile

Tel: 9195042250


Tests Offered

  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Hepatitis A Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Rapid HIV Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

See Tests & Prices

Today's best offer is: $10 off any order. Discount will be applied automatically.

Avance Care South Chapel Hill

98 Chapelton Ct, Ste 310, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516

5.75 mile

Tel: (919) 590-9005


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Sliding Scale
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

CVS MinuteClinic

Please visit the website or call for eligibility requirements. STD testing, HIV PrEP and PEP for patients 18+. Trichomoniasis testing available as part of STD testing services.

1201 Beaver Creek Commons Dr, Apex, North Carolina 27502

8.01 mile

Tel: (866) 389-2727



Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

CVS MinuteClinic

Please visit the website or call for eligibility requirements. STD testing, HIV PrEP and PEP for patients 18+. Trichomoniasis testing available as part of STD testing services.

2797 Nc Hwy 55, Cary, North Carolina 27519

8.49 mile

Tel: (866) 389-2727



Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

CVS MinuteClinic

Please visit the website or call for eligibility requirements. STD testing, HIV PrEP and PEP for patients 18+. Trichomoniasis testing available as part of STD testing services.

7129 Okelly Chapel Rd, Cary, North Carolina 27519

9.52 mile

Tel: (866) 389-2727



Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

Advance Community Health Apex Clinic

Need to register as a patient.

212 S Salem St, Apex, North Carolina 27502

9.54 mile

Tel: (919) 833-3111


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Sliding Scale
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

Piedmont Health Moncure Community Health Center

To receive services client must register as a new patient.

7228 Pittsboro-Moncure Rd, Moncure, North Carolina 27559

9.85 mile

Tel: (919) 542-4991

Tel: (919) 542-3726


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Sliding Scale
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

CVS MinuteClinic

Please visit the website or call for eligibility requirements. STD testing, HIV PrEP and PEP for patients 18+. Trichomoniasis testing available as part of STD testing services.

11314 Us 15 501 Hwy N, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27517

9.9 mile

Tel: (866) 389-2727



Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

Avance Care Morrisville Office

6402 McCrimmon Pkwy, Ste 100, Morrisville, North Carolina 27560

10.37 mile

Tel: (919) 655-1000


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

CVS MinuteClinic

Please visit the website or call for eligibility requirements. STD testing, HIV PrEP and PEP for patients 18+. Trichomoniasis testing available as part of STD testing services.

8210 Renaissance Pkwy, Durham, North Carolina 27713

10.5 mile

Tel: (866) 389-2727



Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

University of North Carolina Memorial Hospital Infectious Diseases Clinic

For HIV/AIDS treatment must already have an HIV+ diagnosis.

5915 Farrington Rd, Ste 102, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27517

10.84 mile

Tel: (919) 966-7198

Tel: (866) 241-7586


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis A Testing
  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Sliding Scale
  • • Insurance Accepted
  • • PrEP for uninsured

Learn More

Piedmont Health Carrboro Community Health Center

Need to register as a patient.

301 Lloyd St, Carrboro, North Carolina 27510

10.98 mile

Tel: (919) 942-8741

Tel: (919) 942-1473


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Sliding Scale
  • • Insurance Accepted

Learn More

UNC Student Health Action Coalition Carborro Clinic

Open to the general public. Provides free health services to local underserved individuals and communities. Free condoms and safer sex supplies are available. PrEP referrals and treatment for bacterial STIs are also available free of charge.

301 Lloyd St, Carrboro, North Carolina 27510

10.98 mile

Tel: (984) 538-1031

Tel: (919) 843-4800


Appointment Required: No


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Rapid HIV Testing

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Free HIV Testing
  • • Free STD Testing
  • • No Fee
  • • Free Hepatitis C Testing

Learn More

Do I have an STD?

Use our confidential STD symptom checker to get an idea of what STDs/STIs your symptoms align with and what STD tests are recommended to you.

Start Symptom Checker

Which Method of STD Testing is Suitable for Me?

STD testing options in North Carolina

Every sexually active individual must protect their sexual health. Regular STD testing is the only way to care for your sexual health. However, sometimes it becomes confusing to select the right testing method as there are so many options available. For your convenience, we have gathered information about all available STD testing methods in North Carolina. Check them out to find out which option is suitable for you.

Private testing (Walk-in clinic)

This is one of the most popular ways to get tested for STDs today. These tests combine the best of both worlds for convenience and accuracy. You will order the test online at home, but you can walk into a professional lab testing center to get tested.

Doctor's office

Another option is to simply visit your regular clinic and talk to your doctor.

At-home STD testing

If you do not want to visit a testing center, then a great alternative is an at-home test kit. You don’t even need to leave your house to get tested for STDs this way, which makes it the most discreet option. Everything is done through email and snail mail.

Community health centers and community clinics

One last option for STD testing is a trip to a free clinic. If you go to a public STD-testing clinic, then you may get a free or discounted test, depending on your financial situation.

Learn more in our ultimate guide to STD testing.

Are STD tests expensive in North Carolina?

It can be, but it does not necessarily have to be. What many people need to understand is that laboratory tests would most often than not be relatively pricey due to the technology that is being utilized behind these diagnostic techniques. However, opting for specific laboratories that offer more convenient testing procedures and discounted prices for diagnostic tests would help ensure that the price will not be much of an issue in providing you with the conclusive diagnosis of your condition. It might take some independent scanning to find the right testing center for you in the most acceptable price range, but it is not as impossible as many people make it out to be.

How long does it usually take for results to come back for an STD test in North Carolina?

Considering that a wide variety of testing kits and laboratory procedures can be performed to determine conclusively whether you have a particular STD or not, the time that it will take for your results to return will also be subject to the same inconsistency. Although there are specific laboratories that could produce your results even by the end of the day (albeit, it is extremely rare for institutions to do so unless necessary), most would often take a few days to a week before the results are either delivered or posted online through your secure personal profile (in the case of online transactions). In addition to that, the capability of the laboratory performing the test may also contribute to the overall timeframe of result delivery – causing delays in cases where there are several requests or understaffed to provide expedited results.

For more information, skip to the FAQs section on this page.

Test Advisor

Types of STD tests

Know all about STD testing options, and the costs of different STD tests.

North Carolina STD Data

STD data & statistics in North Carolina


North Carolina is one of the worst hit states as far as the rates of STDs are concerned. Innerbody.com identified in a study using CDC data from the year 2018 to rank states with the highest/lowest STD rates in the USA. North Carolina's rank was six among the ten high-risk states with the greatest number of cases. North Carolina had reported around 91 376 cases of STDs, which is an alarming situation for a state with roughly 10.3 million residents. This means the state has recorded 889 cases per 100,000 residents.

In North Carolina, the report claims there were over 66,500 cases of chlamydia, over 23,700 cases of gonorrhea, and around 1,100 syphilis cases recorded between 2017 and 2018,

As per the North Carolina 2019 annual STDs statistics, the number of chlamydia cases diagnosed in the state was 71,295, which means the disease impacts 679 people per 100,000. That's a considerable increment from the year 2018 number of cases. If we compare it with the 2015 data, there is a 20% increase in chlamydial infections as the total diagnoses were 39,798 in 2015. Among males, the diagnoses increase by 61%, primarily because men were screened more than women.

In 2019, the total reported gonorrhea cases were 26,643, which means the disease affected 254 people per 100,000 residents. This rate was 23,700 in 2018. In North Carolina, gonorrhea cases have been steadily inclining for the past few years. In 2015, the total number of reported gonorrhea cases was 17,051, at 170 per 100,000 people.

Gonorrhea cases increase more in females as the rate of diagnoses increased by 47% in 2019. The total number of cases in females was 8,570 in 2015, whereas in 2019, the figure jumped to 12,617. Among males, there was a 66% increase in gonorrhea diagnoses. In 2015, around 8,475 males were diagnosed with gonorrhea in North Carolina, and in 2019 nearly 14,026 men were diagnosed with the disease. In terms of the total number of people diagnosed with gonorrhea during the 2018-2019 period, men reported a higher percentage. Compared to 49% in 2015, male diagnoses increased to 53%.

There are three stages of syphilis, primary, secondary, and early non-primary/non-secondary. In North Carolina, the number of early-stage syphilis cases in 2019 was 2,115, which is approximately 20 cases per 100,000 people. The rate of syphilis transmission has slightly increased in North Carolina, compared to the year 2017-18 statistics. In 2017 a total of 1,911 cases were diagnosed, and in 2018 around 1,910 cases were reported, with 18.6 and 18.4 people diagnosed per 100,000 population. Moreover, in 2019, 27 infants were born with congenital syphilis, a startling increment compared to the 19 probable cases of infant congenital syphilis in 2018.

Testing for HIV is Vital

Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus is a virus that targets the immune system of an individual and weakens it over time. If the virus remains undiagnosed and untreated, it eventually weakens the immunity so much that the body is unable to fight any infections. The last stage of this virus, known as AIDS and it can potentially cause deaths.

Testing for HIV is also essential for slowing down the spread of the infection. According to CDC, one in seven HIV-positive people does not know that they are infected. Hence testing is critical. People who are unaware of their HIV-positive status are less likely to take the necessary precautions and aid the spread of the virus to other individuals. Early testing and diagnosis can prevent a lot of damage. Several studies have been conducted indicating the number of HIV-related mortalities is three times higher than that of early diagnosis. A late diagnosis of the virus can be defined as the diagnosis of AIDS in three months of the initial HIV diagnosis.

Considering the CDC data, North Carolina has been ranked as the 8th biggest state for having active HIV cases. In 2015 alone the numbers of new HIV diagnosis in the state were 1,335. According to the HIV/AIDS Report, 2018, the total number of people living with the virus in North Carolina was estimated at 31,864, out of which 1,187 new diagnoses were made during the same year. The rate of people living with HIV per 100,000 populations was estimated at 364.

Black Americans being the second biggest ethnic population living in the state, are most affected by the virus. During the year 2018, 61.3% of people living with HIV in North Carolina were African Americans. Of the total numbers, 24.7% of individuals living with HIV were white Americans, while 8.5% of the population belongs to Hispanic or Latin backgrounds.

It is recommended that all US citizens be tested at least once in their lifetime for the virus. However, CDC recommends testing for HIV to be made a part of the annual checkup in places or localities where the prevalence of the virus is more.

HIV Statistics in North Carolina

According to Us Census Bureau, 2019, North Carolina has a total population of 10.4 million. The largest ethnic groups in the state in White Americans (70%), followed by African Americans (22.2%), Hispanics (9.8%), and individuals from Asian backgrounds (3.2%).

CDC has ranked North Carolina as the 8th biggest state in regards to HIV prevalence. During 2015, the total numbers of newly diagnosed cases were 1335, while in the year 2018, the number of newly diagnosed cases reduced to 1187. The total number of people living with HIV in the year 2018 was estimated to be 31,864.

Age, Ethnicity, Demographic Profile

The Guttmacher Institute reported that in the U.S., on average, young people, which includes those in their early teens, become sexually active at about age 17, and they generally get married in their 20s. The timeline is crucial as they may be exposed to STDs and young females are at a higher risk of unintended pregnancy.

In North Carolina, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and HIV cases have been continually increased since 2015, and the syphilis rate has been relatively the same. In 2016, the state reported 16 infants born with congenital syphilis and two stillbirths due to syphilis. The North Carolina health department reported that STD infection rates were higher among particular racial/ethnic groups. This could result from wealth distribution gaps and poverty that prevent people from getting screened timely and regularly.

Those who cannot meet their basic survival needs will certainly find it difficult to access quality sexual health services. This demographic group has trouble accessing testing facilities.

Comparing the trend of people getting diagnosed with an STD in 2018 in the state, the department identified that most of them belonged to the group living below the poverty line in the state's census tract or coming from a poor neighborhood. Those living in localities with a higher rate of people living below the poverty line were at a higher risk of getting infected and diagnosed with an STD.

The highest number of chlamydia incidence rates was reported in African-Americans in North Carolina compared to other races, including Whites. On the other hand, people aged between 20 and 24 reported the highest rate of chlamydia diagnoses, followed by people between ages 15 and 19 and ages 25 and 29. Around two-thirds of the chlamydia, diagnoses were reported among females.

HIV-Specific Data

Considering the HIV data of the year 2018, a total number of 31,864 people in North Carolina lived with the virus. According to the HIV/AIDS Report, 72 % were males while 28% were females.

Despite having a 22.2% share in the total population, African Americans make up 61.3 percent of the total HIV population in the state. 24.7% of the total HIV patients were White Americans, and 8.5% belonged to Hispanic backgrounds. According to the same report, HIV prevalence was more in the people aged 55 and above (32.7%), followed by 45 to 54 years (28 %). 18.6% of the people with the virus belonged to the age group 25 to 34 years, while 19% of individuals were young adults below 24 years of age.

The modes of transmission of the virus in males are mainly linked to male-to-male sexual contact (73%), heterosexual contact (12.7%), and drug & injection use (7.5%). In females, the virus spread was attributed to heterosexual contact (79%) and drug &injection use (18.4%).

The number of recorded HIV-related deaths during 2018 was 518, while the death rate per 100,000 population was estimated at 6. The percentage of HIV-related mortality is greater in males (74.3) than their female counterparts (25.7%).

Government Initiatives

The government and the North Carolina Health Department have been striving hard to address the inclining rates of STD infections. Public health workers constantly target young men who have sex with men (MSM) and men of color to get them screened. The state's high-risk counties, including Orange, Guilford, Mecklenburg, Wake, Durham, and Forsyth, are the main focus of these efforts. The state runs a peer-to-peer program designated for people at risk of contracting an STD or HIV. for this program. Facilitators are hired from within the community to spread awareness about the dangers of not getting screened for the infection.

The state has also designed a comprehensive sexual education curriculum, including information on STDs and syphilis prevention. Disease Investigation Specialists (DIS's) also outreach those individuals diagnosed with HIV or syphilis. They test partners in the field and diagnose syphilis cases.

However, in North Carolina, there's a dire need to address prejudicial and inequity-based health care systems to prevent the incline in the rates of STD transmissions. In this regard, the state's health department runs a cultural competency training program with health care providers to offer care to people facing discrimination.

Initiatives to Prevent HIV in North Carolina

The North Carolina Public Health department has several programs specializing in supporting people living with HIV belonging to low-income groups and improving the quality of outpatient care services. The programs provide insurance, essential medications, and assistance for the state's eligible low-income residents. North Carolina Public Health Department has also taken the initiative to provide decent and affordable housing facilities to the affected individuals and their families.

Ryan White HIV/AIDS program is a state-funded community-based program that provides critical services to low-income persons living with HIV. Under this program, services like outpatient/ambulatory health services, essential medications, early intervention services, and health insurances are made available to the patients. The program also funds services like delivering meals, transportation, emergency financial assistance, and mental health services.

AIDS Drug Assistance Program, ADAP North Carolina is yet another state initiative to facilitate the uninsured or the underinsured people living with the virus. ADAP ensures the provision of necessary medication and treatment to eligible individuals. One of the basic eligibility requirements of this program is to have a gross family income less than or equal to 300 percent of the Federal Poverty guidelines.

Western North Carolina Community Health Services has been active in the state for the last 20 years. The program serves as an administrator for the Ryan White Part B programs and facilitates the HIV-positive men, women, infants, and children in their treatment.

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  • Aldridge, B., 2020. North Carolina has one of the highest STD rates in the country, study says. Here’s why. [online] The News & Observer. Available at: https://www.newsobserver.com/news/state/north-carolina/article239276153.html
  • Cdc.gov. 2019. STDs Continue to Rise in the U.S. Press Release | CDC. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/2019/2018-STD-surveillance-report-press-release.html
  • Cdc.gov. 2020. Reported STDs in the United States, 2019. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/docs/factsheets/STD-Trends-508.pdf
  • Cdc.gov. 2021. The Lowdown on How to Prevent STDs. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/prevention/lowdown/
  • Guttmacher Institute. 2019. Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health in the United States- SEPTEMBER 2019 FACT SHEET. [online] Available at: https://www.guttmacher.org/fact-sheet/american-teens-sexual-and-reproductive-health.
  • Hoban, R., 2021. STD Rates Bump Up in NC - North Carolina Health News. [online] North Carolina Health News. Available at: https://www.northcarolinahealthnews.org/2017/11/07/std-rates-bump-up-nc/
  • NC DPH Communicable Branch, 2020. NC DPH: HIV/STD Facts & Figures. [online] Epi.dph.ncdhhs.gov. Available at: https://epi.dph.ncdhhs.gov/cd/stds/annualrpts.html
  • Rodriguez, E. and Barclay, T., 2020. These States Have the Highest and Lowest STD Rates (updated 2020). [online] Innerbody. Available at: https://www.innerbody.com/std-testing/std-statistics-by-state.

STD testing FAQs

Similar to what was previously mentioned, herpes infections are known for their recurring tendencies – causing outbreaks now and then and thus causing an intermittent spike in the patient’s viral load for specific instances. In addition to that, other STDs also take time to proliferate and produce a sufficient viral load that could warrant a positive and, more importantly, accurate diagnosis and detection from the tests being administered. As such, detecting an STD a few days following exposure is often complex and unpredictable – leading physicians to follow a certain timeframe instead for testing STDs instead of blindly testing immediately following exposure. Physical exams, however, may supplement inaccurate laboratory diagnoses, especially in cases where the test is prone to false results.

Although NAATs are well-known for their accuracy and sensitivity in detecting most STDs, it is also subject to certain inconsistencies, especially in the case of herpes infections. In Herpes, outbreaks often result in a relative increase in the patient’s viral load – leading to a timeline that usually has specific peaks at certain intervals instead of a consistent rise in viral load throughout. As such, sensitive tests such as NAATs are still unable to accurately diagnose herpes conditions, especially in cases where the patient has recently become asymptomatic and is currently between outbreaks. Other tests such as culture testing and type-specific virologic tests are often employed instead as a confirmatory diagnosis for the patient’s condition.

It would vary depending on the condition that is being tested. STDs behave differently due to the varying pathogenicity of each STD’s causative organism. In some instances, you can get accurately tested as early as two weeks following exposure, while some are intermittently inaccurate due to its recurrence (much like in the case of herpes infections). To avoid this, be sure to discuss the intricacies of the test with your physician to understand whether a particular test could provide you with a conclusive diagnosis or if it still needs another confirmatory test to establish its premise.

It is recommended to get tested for STDs if you have had unprotected sexual contact, multiple sexual partners, or if you are experiencing symptoms associated with STDs. Additionally, regular testing is recommended as part of routine sexual health care, even in the absence of symptoms, especially for individuals who are sexually active.

It does vary on a case-to-case basis. Insurance policies are often particular with the instances that they would be covering with their program. Some may cover severe accidents, some may even consider “orphan disease,” and yes, some may also cover the expenses for performing STD diagnostic tests. However, considering that your insurance provider will have to verify the person's identity availing of the program, STD testing laboratories that employ a minimal collection of patient information may not accept insurance policies to prioritize privacy over affordability.

How Does it Work?

See how simple and easy it is to get tested for STDs in North Carolina today

Most people experience feelings of hesitation when going to get tested for STD, despite knowing they might have contracted one. EasySTD was created to change that.

1

Order your STD test

Visit your nearest lab or clinic, order your home testing kit online, and follow the given instructions from an STD testing provider.

2

Undergo the test

After ordering your STD test, visit the testing center to get tested or take a self sample including urine, cotton swab, or finger prick with the home testing kit and mail it back.

3

Receive you results

Receive the lab-certified results of your STD test from your test provider via mail or phone within 2 to 3 days. If the test comes positive, consult your doctor immediately.

Concerned about an STD?

Help stop the spread of STDs by knowing your status. Get tested today!