STD Testing in Washington

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that around 20 million new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) occur annually in the U.S. on a national level. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are reportedly on the rise since 2010. Particularly worrisome is the rise in rates of common STDs, including gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis. In Washington state (W.A.) STD rates are continually increasing. The rates of common STDs are all going up, specifically among bisexuals, gays, and men who have sex with men, as well as those who use drugs.

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Find an STD testing location near Washington

STDs are generally stigmatized as something extremely shameful and uncurable, while the reality is that these are just illnesses that can be treated if detected timely and early. These diseases are stigmatized, mainly because these are transmitted via sexual activity.

It is essential for young adults and senior citizens to openly communicate with their partners and health care providers regarding issues with their sex lives. This can help reduce stress in their relationships and keep them healthy.

The Washington State Health Department states that STDs can be prevented through consistent condom use, limiting the number of sex partners, and being aware of one’s own and partner(s) testing status. It is important because no one is immune from STDs. Those who are sexually active must get themselves tested regularly at least once a year. Apart from common STDs, they must also get tested for HIV.

If someone tests positive for any STD, the first step to take is protecting people around them from getting infected and encouraging their partners to get tested. Always remember that sexual health is an integral aspect of your overall health. Therefore, it should be evaluated regularly, just like other health aspects. If your health care provider doesn’t ask about it, bring it up yourself to ensure you get the proper test and treatment.

According to the CDC’s guidelines on STD prevention, people under age 25 must get tested annually. However, if you think you could have been exposed to an STD, immediately visit your nearest testing center with your partner for screening and treatment.

Monroe

No Appointment Required

19200 Kelsey St, Monroe, Washington 98272

57.79 mile

Tel: 3607941005


Tests Offered

  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Hepatitis A Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Rapid HIV Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

See Tests & Prices

Today's best offer is: $10 off any order. Discount will be applied automatically.

Columbia Valley Community Health Wenatchee Clinic

Need to register as a patient.

600 Orondo Ave, Ste 1, Wenatchee, Washington 98801

30.22 mile

Tel: (509) 662-6000

Tel: (800) 288-7649

Tel: (509) 664-4590


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis A Testing
  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Care Services Offered

  • • Family Planning
  • • Adult Hepatitis B Vaccine
  • • Hepatitis A Vaccine
  • • Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)
  • • Human Papillomavirus Vaccine
  • • STD Treatment
  • • Primary Care
  • • Dental Care

Prevention Services Offered

  • • TB Prevention/Education
  • • STD Prevention/Education
  • • HIV/AIDS Prevention/Education
  • • HIV Test Counseling

Support Services

  • • PrEP Navigation
  • • Case Management

Audiences

  • • At Risk Persons
  • • General Public
  • • Low Income Persons
  • • Persons with HIV/AIDS
  • • Persons with STDs
  • • Women
  • • HIV Positive Persons
  • • Men

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Sliding Scale
  • • Insurance Accepted
  • • PrEP for uninsured

Languages

  • • English
  • • Spanish

Learn More

Confluence Health Infectious Diseases

933 Red Apple Rd, Wenatchee, Washington 98801

30.72 mile

Tel: (509) 665-6212


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Syphilis Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Care Services Offered

  • • Hepatitis B Treatment
  • • Hepatitis C Treatment
  • • HIV/AIDS Medical Treatment
  • • Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)
  • • STD Treatment
  • • TB Treatment

Audiences

  • • At Risk Persons
  • • General Public

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted

Languages

  • • English

Learn More

Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho Wenatchee Health Center

900 Ferry St, Wenatchee, Washington 98801

30.77 mile

Tel: (866) 904-7721

Tel: (509) 248-3644


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Gonorrhea Testing
  • • Herpes Testing
  • • Chlamydia Testing
  • • Rapid HIV Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Care Services Offered

  • • Family Planning
  • • Adult Hepatitis B Vaccine
  • • Hepatitis A Vaccine
  • • Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)
  • • Human Papillomavirus Vaccine
  • • STD Treatment

Prevention Services Offered

  • • STD Prevention/Education
  • • HIV/AIDS Prevention/Education
  • • HIV Test Counseling

Audiences

  • • Adolescents/Youth/Teens
  • • Adults
  • • At Risk Persons
  • • General Public
  • • Low Income Persons
  • • Persons with HIV/AIDS
  • • Persons with STDs
  • • Women
  • • Men
  • • Hispanics/Latinos
  • • LGBT

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Insurance Accepted
  • • Donations Accepted

Languages

  • • English
  • • Spanish
  • • Interpretation Services Available for Non-English Languages

Learn More

Columbia Valley Community Health Chelan Medical and Dental

Need to register as a patient.

105 S Apple Blossom Dr, Chelan, Washington 98816

35.44 mile

Tel: (509) 682-6000

Tel: (509) 664-4590


Appointment Required: Yes


Tests Offered

  • • Hepatitis A Testing
  • • Hepatitis C Testing
  • • Hepatitis B Testing
  • • TB Testing
  • • Conventional HIV Testing

Care Services Offered

  • • Family Planning
  • • Adult Hepatitis B Vaccine
  • • Hepatitis A Vaccine
  • • Human Papillomavirus Vaccine
  • • STD Treatment
  • • Primary Care
  • • Dental Care

Prevention Services Offered

  • • TB Prevention/Education
  • • STD Prevention/Education
  • • HIV/AIDS Prevention/Education
  • • HIV Test Counseling

Support Services

  • • Case Management

Audiences

  • • At Risk Persons
  • • General Public
  • • Low Income Persons
  • • Persons with HIV/AIDS
  • • Persons with STDs
  • • Women
  • • Persons with Hepatitis
  • • Men

Fees & Payment Information

  • • Fee
  • • Medicaid Accepted
  • • Medicare Accepted
  • • Sliding Scale
  • • Insurance Accepted

Languages

  • • English
  • • Spanish

Learn More

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Which Method of STD Testing is Suitable for Me?

STD testing options in Washington

Every sexually active individual must protect their sexual health. Regular STD testing is the only way to care for your sexual health. However, sometimes it becomes confusing to select the right testing method as there are so many options available. For your convenience, we have gathered information about all available STD testing methods in Washington. Check them out to find out which option is suitable for you.

Testing MethodWaiting TimesSpeed of ResultsPositive Consultation

Private Testing (Walk-In Clinic)

10-20 Minutes with No Wait

24-72 Hours

Free With Positive Result

At-Home STD Testing

No Wait

5-11 Days

Free With Positive Result

Doctor Visit

with Insurance

Call for Appointment

7-10 Days

Co-Pay Required

Doctor Visit

without Insurance

Call for Appointment

7-10 Days

Out-of-Pocket Cost Required

Public Clinic

Limited Hours and Long Lines

7-14 Days

No

Learn more in our ultimate guide to STD testing.

It does vary on a case-to-case basis. Insurance policies are often particular with the instances that they would be covering with their program. Some may cover severe accidents, some may even consider “orphan disease,” and yes, some may also cover the expenses for performing STD diagnostic tests. However, considering that your insurance provider will have to verify the person's identity availing of the program, STD testing laboratories that employ a minimal collection of patient information may not accept insurance policies to prioritize privacy over affordability.

Considering that a wide variety of testing kits and laboratory procedures can be performed to determine conclusively whether you have a particular STD or not, the time that it will take for your results to return will also be subject to the same inconsistency. Although there are specific laboratories that could produce your results even by the end of the day (albeit, it is extremely rare for institutions to do so unless necessary), most would often take a few days to a week before the results are either delivered or posted online through your secure personal profile (in the case of online transactions). In addition to that, the capability of the laboratory performing the test may also contribute to the overall timeframe of result delivery – causing delays in cases where there are several requests or understaffed to provide expedited results.

Standard STD testing can detect common sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus), chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, and hepatitis B and C. Additional tests may be required for less common STDs or specific situations.

It would vary depending on the condition that is being tested. STDs behave differently due to the varying pathogenicity of each STD’s causative organism. In some instances, you can get accurately tested as early as two weeks following exposure, while some are intermittently inaccurate due to its recurrence (much like in the case of herpes infections). To avoid this, be sure to discuss the intricacies of the test with your physician to understand whether a particular test could provide you with a conclusive diagnosis or if it still needs another confirmatory test to establish its premise.

Similar to what was previously mentioned, herpes infections are known for their recurring tendencies – causing outbreaks now and then and thus causing an intermittent spike in the patient’s viral load for specific instances. In addition to that, other STDs also take time to proliferate and produce a sufficient viral load that could warrant a positive and, more importantly, accurate diagnosis and detection from the tests being administered. As such, detecting an STD a few days following exposure is often complex and unpredictable – leading physicians to follow a certain timeframe instead for testing STDs instead of blindly testing immediately following exposure. Physical exams, however, may supplement inaccurate laboratory diagnoses, especially in cases where the test is prone to false results.

Test Advisor

Types of STD tests

Get informed about the different STD testing options and the prices for each test.

Washington STD Data

STD data & statistics in Washington


Testing for HIV is Vital

Washington has been ranked 24th most populated state in terms of having HIV cases. The growing number of newly diagnosed cases in Washington is an area of concern for the State authorities and the federal government.

According to CDC, one of every seven people in the United States with HIV isn’t aware of their illness or isn’t diagnosed. As per a CDC report, during the year 2015, a total number of 39,393 people were diagnosed with HIV, of which 450 cases were reported from Washington State.

The HIV/AIDS Report, 2018 indicates that the state has 13,614 cases of people living with HIV. In 2018 alone, 504 individuals, both adults, and adolescents were newly diagnosed with the disease. According to the report, male residents of the state were affected more than their female counterparts. 84.4 % of males and 15.6% of females constituted the total number of people living with HIV in Washington.

While African Americans are present in minorities in Washington State, the rate of black African male's HIV diagnosis is 3.4 times higher than the white males. Similarly, the rate of African American females living with the disease is 22.6 times higher than that of their white counterparts.

HIV tested and diagnosed in time can be treated to avoid further complications. Late diagnosis of HIV/AIDS is a strong predictor of HIV-related deaths. According to various studies conducted, the late diagnosis of the disease shows three folds higher death rates than the early diagnosis. Late diagnosis of HIV is defined as having a diagnosis of AIDS within three months of the HIV diagnosis.

Out of the total cases diagnosed during the year 2018 in Washington, 110 were late diagnoses. CDC reports that one in every seven individuals living with HIV in the United States isn’t aware of the illness. It is recommended that adolescents and adults belonging to the age group 13 to 64 should be tested at least once in their lifetime to avoid the complications of late diagnosis. Testing for HIV should be made mandatory and a part of the annual checkup for those who live in the state's HIV-populated areas.

STD Rates in Washington

In WA, STDs are the most commonly reported infectious diseases of all. STDs comprise around 74% of all notifiable diseases/conditions reported to the state’s Health Department in 2018. In WA, health care providers and labs are required to report confirmed cases of common STDs like gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes, syphilis, chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, and granuloma inguinale to local health departments. Reportedly, chlamydia, syphilis, and gonorrhea cases all increased between 2017 and 2018 in W.A. CDC reports that chlamydia is the most common STD in the state. Still, the three diseases are rising steadily over the past ten years.

In WA, the rate of primary/secondary syphilis in 2011 was 4.8 per 100,000 people, which inclined to 6.3 cases per 100,000 in 2015, making it the 15th most at-risk state in the U.S. in terms of syphilis. Between 2011 and 2015, there were nine congenital cases reported across the state. W.A. ranked 36th among the U.S. states in chlamydial infections with 406 cases/100,000 people and 27th in gonorrheal infections with 101 cases/100,000 as per 2015 statistics. The same year, chlamydia cases among females were reportedly two times higher than males, with 539.9/100,000 and 273.4/100,000, respectively.

In 2018, W.A. reported seven cases of congenital syphilis, which was 33rd highest nationwide, 802 cases of primary/secondary syphilis, which was 14th highest, over 34, 467 chlamydia cases, 36th highest nationwide, and 11,207 gonorrhea cases, 31st highest in the U.S. The number of chlamydial infections in 2018 marked a whopping 47% incline since 2010.

In WA, the gonorrhea infection rate has increased consistently since 2012. In 2018, there were nearly 151 cases reported per 100,000 people in the state, marking a 354% increase since 2010 rates. Regarding primary/secondary syphilis, WA reported 10.9 cases/100,000 people, which is higher than the national average of 10.8 cases/100,000 that year. Around 63% of the primary/secondary syphilis cases were reported in King, Snohomish, and Pierce Counties, while 13% were reported in Spokane County.

HIV Statistics in Washington

According to the US Census Bureau, Washington State has a total population of 7.29 million. The biggest ethnic groups in the state are American Whites that makeup 69.3 % of the total population. The second biggest ethnic groups belonging to Hispanic backgrounds make up 12.4 %, followed by 8.11% Asians. The smallest ethnic group remains Black Americans, that make up 3.7% of the entire population.

The Center for Disease Control has ranked

Washington State at 24th most populated states in HIV prevalence. During 2015 a total of 450 adults and adolescents were diagnosed with HIV, while the numbers slowly rose to 504 in 2018. As per the HIV/AIDS report, there were a total number of 13,614 people living with HIV in Washington State in 2018, as per AIDsvu.

Age, Gender, and Ethnic Profile

According to the statistics released by the Washington State Department of Health, in the state, STDs rates were the highest among bisexual, gay, and men who have sex with men (MSM). In 2018, almost all W.A. counties reported one or more chlamydia or gonorrhea infection.

Women between the 15 and 24 age group reportedly had the highest chlamydia cases, which is primarily attributed to better screening and diagnosis trends among females of childbearing age. On the other hand, transgender persons reported less than one percent of all chlamydia diagnoses in 2018. In the state, chlamydia rates were the lowest among White non-Hispanics while African-Americans had the most cases. The trend was higher among black, non-Hispanic females. The overall chlamydia rates for non-Hispanic African-Americans and Hispanics were higher than the national average.

Pregnant females are at the greatest risk for the detrimental outcomes of untreated STDs as congenital syphilis has become a concerning issue in W.A. Between 2014 and 2018, 23 cases of congenital syphilis were reported, while between 1995 and 2013, just 13 cases were reported. Congenital syphilis is a chronic infectious disease the fetus acquires in the uterus after conception.

Gonorrhea rates in W.A. were higher among males aged between 25 and 34 than females in most age groups. This could be partly attributed to the higher number of cases being reported among MSM. Around 4% of males in W.A. are MSM; still, it represented 47% of all male gonorrhea cases in 2018. Conversely, transgender people represented fewer than one percent of cases. Gonorrhea cases were reportedly higher among non-Hispanic Black males and lowest for non-Hispanic white females in 2018. For non-Hispanic White, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic Blacks, the rates of gonorrhea were higher than the national average.

In W.A., men reportedly had a higher number of primary/secondary syphilis than women in 2018. Males between 25 and 34 years of age had the highest number of cases, while MSM reportedly represented 75% of all male cases. Transgender people reported fewer than one percent cases in W.A. The rates of primary/secondary syphilis were highest among non-Hispanic Blacks and lowest among non-Hispanic Whites. Data on female syphilis cases was not sufficient enough to make an appropriate comparison. However, the rate of primary/secondary syphilis cases among the White population was higher in W.A. than the national average.

HIV-Specific Data

As per the HIV/AIDS report from AIDSvu, the total number of HIV active cases recorded in the year 2018 was 13,614, out of which 504 were newly diagnosed during the same year.

According to statistics, HIV has affected 42.5 % white Americans, 28.8 African Americans, and 17.9 individuals belonging to Hispanic backgrounds. 32 % of the entire HIV-positive population belonged to 25 to 34 years, followed by 25 % of 35 to 44 years. Around 12% of the patients were young adults belonging to the age group 13 to 24. The Human immune deficiency virus affected males more than females. Of the total diagnosis, 73.4 % were males, while 26.6 % were females.

The report also shows that the spread of the virus was male to male sexual contact (77%), 11% due to injection or drug use, and around 5 % due to heterosexual contact. According to the same report, the total number of deaths of people with HIV during 2018 was 217. The death rate of people with HIV per 100,000 population during the same year was recorded at 3. Of the total number of mortalities, 84.8 % were males while 15.2 % were females.

Government Initiatives

The Washington State Health Department has collaborated with local medical care providers, public health agencies, and community partners to improve their STDs diagnostic capabilities and treat and prevent their further spreading. The Department of Health (DOH) wants all sexually active people to get tested for STDs and HIV since early detection can potentially intrude the spread of STDs.

Zandt Bryan, the Infectious Disease Field Services Coordinator for the DOH, stated that local health jurisdictions, community partners, and health care providers could play a significant role in preventing or at least reducing the spread of STDs in W.A. Teams of disease intervention specialists are working closely with people infected with an STD or exposed to the disease. When someone tests positive for an STD in W.A., a disease intervention specialist contacts him or her to make sure they receive the right treatment, are fully aware of their condition, and have realized the need to stay healthy after getting treated.

Disease intervention specialists also contact people already exposed to the disease or at risk for STDs, including drug-using partners of someone having tested positive for an STD, offering free testing, and creating STD testing/treatment plans.

Initiatives to prevent HIV in Washington

Washington State has been actively involved in building a solid foundation on public and private investments to prevent the spread of the virus and improve the living conditions of individuals who already contracted HIV.

The state of Washington has formulated a steering team that works towards reducing the adverse effects of HIV in the state. The goals of the steering team involve reducing the new diagnosis by at least 50%, age-adjusted mortalities for people living with HIV by 25%, and HIV-related health disparities. Improving the quality of life and providing treatment for people living with HIV is also one of its goals. The steering team also conducts educational sessions in various community areas to educate the general public about preventive measures.

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has a specialized program called the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program. Ryan White HIV/AIDS program is a federal initiative that provides an elaborate system providing primary care and services to low-income people who have HIV. The program is functional in almost all states, and it's actively performing its operations in Washington State.

Department of Health, Washington has also taken a step towards making Washington State an HIV-free state by allocating funds for HIV and various STD screening to individuals who cannot afford these services. In the case of positive HIV individuals belonging to low-income groups, the requisite treatment is provided using the State funds.

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) assistance program is specially designed for individuals belonging to communities or localities highly affected by the virus. Washington was one of the first states to provide the Drug Assistance program. If taken in the recommended dose, the drug is highly effective in the prevention of HIV.

Expand
  • Cdc.gov. 2016. Washington – State Health Profile. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/stateprofiles/pdf/washington_profile.pdf
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2019. 2018 Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats18/default.htm
  • Doh.wa.gov. 2020. STD Fast Facts: Washington State 2018. [online] Available at: https://www.doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/Documents/Pubs/347-350-FastFacts2018.pdf
  • Healthypeople.gov. 2021. Sexually Transmitted Diseases | Healthy People 2020. [online] Available at: https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/sexually-transmitted-diseases
  • Medium. 2018. Record STD Rates in Washington. [online] Available at: https://medium.com/wadepthealth/record-std-rates-in-washington-37e71f86226c
  • The Daily Chronicle. 2019. STD Rates are on the Rise in Washington, According to Recent Data. [online] Available at: https://www.chronline.com/stories/std-rates-are-on-the-rise-in-washington-according-to-recent-data,7255

How Does it Work?

See how simple and easy it is to get tested for STDs in Washington today

Most people experience feelings of hesitation when going to get tested for STD, despite knowing they might have contracted one. EasySTD was created to change that.

1

Order your STD test

Visit your nearest lab or clinic, order your home testing kit online, and follow the given instructions from an STD testing provider.

2

Undergo the test

After ordering your STD test, visit the testing center to get tested or take a self sample including urine, cotton swab, or finger prick with the home testing kit and mail it back.

3

Receive you results

Receive the lab-certified results of your STD test from your test provider via mail or phone within 2 to 3 days. If the test comes positive, consult your doctor immediately.

Concerned about an STD?

Help stop the spread of STDs by knowing your status. Get tested today!